Waste Management

Turning today's waste into tomorrow's resource

For our business to thrive, pollution must be reduced and natural resources must be protected. Using things for as long as possible and then recycling them helps to do this.

We aim to minimise our waste and to recycle, reuse, convert into energy or return safely to the environment as much of it as possible. This will reduce our impact on the environment, improve efficiency and reduce costs.

 

 

GROUP PERFORMANCE


 

We started reporting the amounts of waste disposed of and recycled at a group level in 2014. In 2016, we disposed of 4% more waste than in 2015 and recycled 12% more waste than in 2015. Swire Properties (including its tenants) generated more than half of our waste in 2016.

Reduce

We encourage operating companies to reduce waste by improving procurement and operations and by using less packaging and more sustainable materials.

As part of their SD2030 strategy, Swire Properties has set the following waste reduction targets:

  • By 2020, achieve a 25% commercial waste diversion rate from landfills for its Hong Kong portfolio
  • By 2020, achieve a 80% demolition waste diversion rate from landfills for its Hong Kong projects
  • By 2020, achieve a 60% construction waste diversion rate from landfills for its Hong Kong projects

Swire Beverages has to use bottles, cans and other packaging. To reduce waste, Swire Beverages tries to use lightweight packaging and to minimise its amount. Since 2012, the weight of each aluminium can has been reduced by 22%, so saving about 513 tonnes of aluminium.

Recycle

We aim to recycle more paper, plastic, metal, glass, construction material, food and electronic items. In 2016, Cathay Pacific recycled 10,799 kg of plastic cups, 20,242 kg of plastic bottles, 22,066 kg of aluminium cans and 568,148 kg of glass bottles on inbound flights to Hong Kong. Regulations make recycling on outbound flights difficult. In 2016, Cathay Dragon recycled 3,826 kg of plastic bottles and 1,516 kg of aluminium cans.

Recover

Cathay Pacific has an investment in Fulcrum BioEnergy, which is developing a technology for converting household waste into fuel.

We are improving our collection and monitoring of information about waste. As part of the new Group sustainability strategy Thrive, we are developing a road map for minimising our adverse impact on the environment caused by waste.

CASE STUDY
CASE STUDY 01

Food Waste

Food Waste

Landfills in Hong Kong are getting full. Approaching 40% of the waste which goes into landfills is food. Swire Properties has food decomposers at one of its Hong Kong shopping malls, at EAST, Hong Kong and at Taikoo Place. With Food Angel and the Foodlink Foundation Swire Properties donates excess food to people in need. Tenants’ food waste is converted into fish feed and soil conditioner.

In 2016, guidelines for the management of food waste (including the separation of food from other waste) were provided to tenants at Cityplaza and Taikoo Place. 22 tenants sent over 160 tonnes of food waste for composting.

CASE STUDY 01
CASE STUDY 02

Waste Management Cathay Pacific Catering Services

Waste Management Cathay Pacific Catering Services

Cathay Pacific Catering Services (CPCS) operates the principal flight kitchen in Hong Kong, catering to 45 international airlines in Hong Kong and producing an average of 83,000 meals a day.

Unopened juice, cereal and other pre-packaged food (237 tonnes in 2016) is collected from inbound flights and delivered to welfare centres. In 2016, 1,133 tonnes of food scraps and leftovers were converted into fish feed. Used cooking oil is made available for the production of bio-diesel. Food containers are collected, sorted and processed for recycling, reuse or disposal.

CASE STUDY 02

 

CASE STUDY 03

Aircraft Recycling

Aircraft Recycling

When Cathay Pacific retires an aircraft (six in 2016), they salvage, recycle or reuse as much of the aircraft as is practicable. When an aircraft retires from their fleet, they work with aircraft manufacturers, the Aircraft Fleet Recycling Association (AFRA), accredited companies, and other companies specialised in end-of-life solutions for aircraft in order to find ways of salvaging spare parts, and recycling or reusing aircraft parts and materials. Many components can be re-certified and reused, by Cathay Pacific or others. Some major components (engines, auxiliary power units and avionics components) can be retained as spares.

Eight retiring Airbus A340 - 300 aircraft have been dealt with under Airbus’ PAMELA initiative (Process for Advanced Management of End-of-Life Aircraft). Up to 90% of their components can be recycled, reused, or recovered. Cathay Pacific’s remaining three Airbus A340 - 300 aircraft are being or will be dealt with under PAMELA this year.

CASE STUDY 03
GALLERY

Swire Beverages continues to look for opportunities to improve its fleet by exploring renewable energy sources and investing in fuel efficient vehicles. Within its Hong Kong fleet are six hybrid trucks, two electric vehicles and four 16t trucks installed the solar powered air conditioning unit.

Photo circa 1980

GALLERY

The Swire Marine Training Centre is used for the training of officers in Safety Management, Anchor-Handling, Dynamic Positioning, Engineering and Electrical Maintenance.